Supreme Court grants Trump's bid to revive full travel ban for now

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The Supreme Court allowed the third version of President Trump's travel ban to go into effect Monday while legal challenges in lower appeals courts continue.

The Supreme Court justices said they expect the lower appeals courts to expedite their decisions, leaving open the possibility that the policy could return to the Supreme Court in yet another legal challenge to the White House.

For now, most citizens of Iran, Libya, Syria, Yemen, Somalia, Chad and North Korea will be barred from entering the United States, along with some groups of people from Venezuela.

President Trump contended that the ban has been necessary to stop terrorist assaults by way of Islamic militants.

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The new policy is not expected to cause the chaos that ensued at airports when Trump rolled out his first ban without warning in January. Both sets of challengers said the latest ban, like the earlier ones, discriminates against Muslims in violation of the US Constitution and is not permissible under immigration laws.

"President Trump's anti-Muslim prejudice is no secret". He has repeatedly confirmed it, including just last week on Twitter. Citing statements from Mr. Trump, some made as a presidential candidate and some more recent, Judge Chuang found that the new proclamation was tainted by religious animus and most likely violated the Constitution's prohibition of government establishment of religion. "It's unfortunate that the full ban can move forward for now, but this order does not address the merits of our claims". "We continue to stand for freedom, equality and for those who are unfairly being separated from their loved ones", Jadwat added.

People from the affected countries will be categorically refused entry visas unless they have "bona fide" links inside the U.S., such as business transactions or close family relationships.

If anything, it said, the government's case has weakened.

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Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Justice Sonia Sotomayor said they would have denied the government's request. Certain people from each targeted country can still apply for a visa for tourism, business or education purposes, and any applicant can ask for an individual waiver. Litigation on the constitutionality of the travel ban remains ongoing, with oral arguments scheduled this week in the US Courts of Appeals for the Fourth and Ninth Circuits. The 4th US Circuit Court of Appeals will arguments on the merits of case spearheaded by the ACLU on Friday in Richmond.

The Supreme Court on Monday gave President Trump another major win by granting his administration's request to fully reinstate the third version of his travel ban. The second one expired in September after a long court fight and was replaced with the present version.

"Multiple government agencies have conducted a comprehensive, worldwide review of the information shared by foreign governments that is used to screen aliens seeking entry to the US", US Solicitor General Noel Francisco argued in court papers.

Alternatively, the proclamation allows the secretary of homeland security to recommend to the president the removal of a country from the travel restrictions if the administration determines that the country has implemented proper vetting and screening standards that meet the security interests of the United States.

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