Kevin Pietersen slams ICC's decision to ban Kagiso Rabada Kicker

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Much of that may be put down to the absence of Kagiso Rabada - South Africa's 11-wicket spearhead in the second Test has been banned for the remainder of the tour after racking up the demerit points in his altercation with Steve Smith.

Rabada was also fined 50 percent of his match fee and issued three demerit points after a disciplinary hearing following his denial of the charge.

Warner committed a level-two offence in the first Test.

Rabada was charged with a level two offence after he made contact with the Australian captain after taking his wicket on the opening day of the second Test. "Now, I just want to keep performing and winning games for the team and to keep getting better and better".

"If I do get banned, I will have to see it as a big learning curve and not repeat the same mistake".

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"I have to move forward".

"It's what I always wanted to do", Rabada said when he reached No.1 for the first time in January.

Not only that, but a further level 1 incident has been raised against Rabada for the manner in which he showed he was happy that David Warner had gotten out in the second innings.

Whether caught behind or low or on three occasions even directly bowled, there can be no doubt that this is a direct strategy of Rabada himself, if not the entire team and management as well. "The ICC shouldn't be so sensitive", Du Plessis said.

Rabada is already sitting on 5 points and an additional 3-4 would result in a two-Test suspension, ruling him out of the rest of the series. In isolation, the incident would not be worthy of a ban, but Rabada's bank of demerit points changes that.

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"I found that there was contact between Rabada and Smith, and in my judgement the contact by Rabada was inappropriate, and deliberate", said match referee Jeff Crowe.

Cricket South Africa (CSA) immediately announced they would appeal the decision and said they were seeking legal opinion.

"We haven't got a hundred so far in this series, so that's not ideal", Smith told Australian radio station SEN.

"It's just a part of batting, sometimes you have to work really hard for your runs and take a little bit longer, and some days you come out and things happen really quickly for you". His father is a doctor and his mother a lawyer and he went to a well-known private school in Johannesburg, one of the most expensive in the country. Through the majesty of AB de Villiers, South Africa did that easily and levelled the series 1-1. Anticipating the ban, he said: "I would have loved to be playing in the next game, especially coming off a performance like that".

Rabada, who kept his aggression under control on Monday - although it's likely too late for that - also dismissed Pat Cummins and Mitchell Starc as the Australians folded in less than 10 overs of the fourth day. South Africa, by comparison, have had hundreds in each Test - from Aiden Markram in Durban and de Villiers in Port Elizabeth.

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