Officials promote lower-cost, short-term health plans

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Four cities filed a lawsuit against President Donald Trump, accusing the president of violating the Constitution through his repeated attempts to undermine the Affordable Care Act, NBC News is reporting. That may not translate to broad consumer appeal among people who need an individual policy.

"This will at least provide a little bit of relief for people who are otherwise essentially forgotten by the Affordable Care Act", Antos says.

A major insurer group quickly expressed disapproval. Many comments came from people who said they have existing medical conditions that - before the Affordable Care Act's consumer protections were put in place - would have been unable to get insurance that would cover their condition.

"We make no representation that it's equivalent coverage", Parker said. Three-quarters of respondents to a recent Kaiser Family Foundation poll said it is "very important" that Obamacare's rule prohibiting insurers from denying coverage due to a person's medical history remains law, while almost that many feel the same way about banning insurers from charging sick people higher rates.

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But Oregon consumers should take note: The state allows these short-term plans for three months but then the insurer must wait 60 days before issuing another short-term plan to the same policyholder. 'They are not going to cover anything related to a pre-existing condition.

"By actively and avowedly wielding executive authority to sabotage the ACA, defendants are not acting in good faith; instead, they have usurped Congress's lawmaking function, and they are violating the Constitution", the complaint said.

Both supporters and critics of short-term plans say consumers who do develop health problems while enrolled could, in theory, hang on until the next open-enrollment period and buy an ACA plan during the sign-up period because the ACA bars insurers from rejecting people with preexisting conditions. "President Trump is bringing more affordable insurance options back to the market, including through allowing the renewal of short-term plans".

He cited a Health and Human Services Department study that said that average premiums for individual market insurance rose 105 percent from 2013 to 2107 under the Affordable Care Act.

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'It's a way better alternative to not being insured, ' said Jeff Smedsrud of Pivot Health. In June, the administration released final rules on association health plans, which grants greater leeway to small businesses and sole proprietors to join together to purchase insurance that doesn't have to meet all the ACA's requirements, although AHP plans are more robust than short-term plans.

The goal was to ensure that everyone has access to quality health coverage without discriminating against those who have pre-existing medical conditions.

Association for Community Affiliated Plans CEO Margaret A. Murray said in a prepared statement: "Fake insurance is no substitute for real coverage". Such plans can be offered across state lines and are also designed for self-employed people.

Enrollment for the law's subsidized private insurance is fairly stable, and HealthCare.gov insurers are making money again.

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But a recent Kaiser Foundation analysis found turmoil in the unsubsidized market after two years of double-digit premium increases forced many consumers to drop out or seek other coverage.

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